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Thursday, June 05, 2008

Listen to this!

If you're bored of your looping MP3 playlist (those are all legal, right?), here's some interesting listening material for you.

Lay off the stuff

I've posted about The Story of Stuff before, and also about Colin Bevin aka NoImpactMan. Well recently Rebecca Clark, a Methodist preacher from the states gave a great sermon preaching the same lose-the-stuff concept and emphasised the advantages. She also mentioned Colin's project and challenged her congregation to try abstaining from some of their stuff for a couple of days. Whether you're a Christian or not, this is a great sermon to listen to, and if you are a Christian you'll find it interesting to hear the Bible does indeed back up the 'less stuff' mantra. The sermon page can be found here, or stream the MP3 below.

Gamasutra Podcast is back!

After the GDC Radio Gamasutra Podcast had to be put on hold for a while for personal reasons, Tom Kim is back in the saddle at last. For this edition he's interviewing Gamecity director Ian Simons, and I have to say it sounds like an awesome event and I wish I could attend it! Ian also has some interesting views about the industry and how we continually compare ourselves to cinema. Check it out on GDCRadio or stream it below.

4 comments:

pastorbecca said...

Oh, wow! I'm glad you liked the sermon and gave it a listen. There's another one (I think it's called "To A Known God") from earth day that was kind of a greeny theme if you want to check it out, but thanks so much for listening and spreading the word.

Peace,
Becca

Flint said...

I loved it Becca! If your congregation was a bit closer (as in a couple thousand kms closer) I'd definitely pay it a visit :)
I've actually listened to it a couple of times. I feel that one of the most neglected things in Christianity is that we were given stewardship of the earth, and with that comes the responsibility to look after it. As such Christian teachings should go hand in hand with sustainability, but more often than not they don't.

pastorbecca said...

Flint, thanks again for listening (more than once!).

There is a movement that spans denominations and even bridges the liberal/conservative divide to make stewardship of the earth a top Christian issue. If one takes seriously either the claim that all that is is of God and is sacred or that God created the world (literally or metaphorically), then our task is clear-- we need to include the earth and its inhabitants-- animal, mineral, and vegetable-- on our list of those who are 'the least of these,' the ones who can't defend ourselves. In a vaguely panentheistic way, I believe the earth is God's body too, and whatever we do to the earth, we do to god. Do we abuse, neglect and take for granted God, or do we reverence and honor and nurture God's body?

Add to that the fact that negative environmnetal conditions disproportionately impact those living in poverty, and it is clear that there are very few problems that are more pervasive, more threatening to the life and well being of all God's children, more absolutely essential for the people of God to address than the problem of humanity's impact on the earth.

Blessings,
Becca

I'm following your lead and double-replying.

Flint said...

"Add to that the fact that negative environmnetal conditions disproportionately impact those living in poverty, and it is clear that there are very few problems that are more pervasive, more threatening to the life and well being of all God's children, more absolutely essential for the people of God to address than the problem of humanity's impact on the earth."
If that isn't a quotable quote, I don't know what is! Looking at everything is [part] of God is an interesting way of seeing it, and definitely strengthens the argument for Christianity and environmentalism to have closer ties. I did listen to the other sermon, enjoyed that one too :)

 

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